Tag Archives: Modern Family

2010 Primetime Emmy Award Nominees

8 Jul

Earlier today, Modern Family’s Sofia Vergara and Community’s Joel McHale announced the nominees for the 62nd Annual Primetime Emmy Awards.  The broadcast, which will be hosted by Jimmy Fallon, will air August 29.  It was a great year for new nominees and veterans alike.  Along with perennial favorites such as 30 Rock and Monk, new additions to the race include Glee and Modern Family

Friday Night Lights also made a great showing with nominations in both the Outstanding Lead Actor and Outstanding Lead Actress categories.  Chicago is well represented with Jane Lynch securing two(!) nominations for Glee (Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series) and Two and a Half Men (Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series).  Kathy Griffin’s My Life on the D-List was nominated as well for Outstanding Reality Programming. Andre Braugher and Ann-Margret are additional Chicagoans who were nominated for an Emmy today.

Some of the more shocking names left off this year’s nomination list include Cougar Town’s Courteney Cox and Grey’s Anatomy’s Chandra WilsonHBO’s True Blood managed an Outstanding Drama Series nomination, but couldn’t wrestle any individual nominations.

2010 Nominees:

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
Jim Parsons – The Big Bang Theory
Larry David – Curb Your Enthusiasm
Matthew Morrison – Glee
Alec Baldwin – 30 Rock
Steve Carell – The Office
Tony Shalhoub – Monk

 

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series:
Lea Michele – Glee
Edie Falco – Nurse Jackie
Tina Fey – 30 Rock
Julia Louis-Dreyfus – The New Adventures of Old Christine
Amy Poehler – Parks and Recreation
Toni Collette – The United States of Tara

 

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series:
Bryan Cranston – Breaking Bad
Michael C. Hall – Dexter
Kyle Chandler – Friday Night Lights
Hugh Laurie – House
Matthew Fox- LOST
Jon Hamm – Mad Men

 

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series:
Kyra Sedgwick – The Closer
Connie Britton – Friday Night Lights
Glenn Close – Damages
Julianna Margulies – The Good Wife
January Jones – Mad Men
Mariska Hargitay – Law & Order: SVU

 

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series:
Chris Colfer – Glee
Neil Patrick Harris – How I Met Your Mother
Jesse Tyler Ferguson – Modern Family
Eric Stonestreet – Modern Family
Ty Burrell – Modern Family
Jon Cryer – Two and a Half Men

 

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series:
Jane Lynch – Glee
Julie Bowen – Modern Family
Sofia Vergara – Modern Family
Kristen Wiig – Saturday Night Live
Jane Krakowski – 30 Rock
Holland Taylor – Two and a Half Men

 

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series:
Aaron Paul – Breaking Bad
Martin Short – Damages
Terry O’Quinn – LOST
Michael Emerson – LOST
John Slattery – Mad Men
Andre Braugher – Men of a Certain Age

 

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series:
Sharon Gless – Burn Notice
Rose Byrne – Damages
Archie Panjabi – The Good Wife
Christine Baranksi – The Good Wife
Christina Hendricks – Mad Men
Elisabeth Moss – Mad Men

 

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series:
Mike O’Malley – Glee
Neil Patrick Harris – Glee
Fred Willard – Modern Family
Eli Wallach – Nurse Jackie
Jon Hamm – 30 Rock
Will Arnett – 30 Rock

 

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series:
Christine Baranski – The Big Bang Theory
Kathryn Joosten – Desperate Housewives
Kristin Chenoweth – Glee
Tina Fey – Saturday Night Live
Betty White – Saturday Night Live
Jane Lynch – Two and a Half Men

 

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series:
Beau Bridges – The Closer
Ted Danson – Damages
John Lithgow – Dexter
Alan Cumming – The Good Wife
Dylan Baker – The Good Wife
Robert Morse – Mad Men
Gregory Itzin – 24

 

Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series:
Mary Kay Place – Big Love
Sissy Spacek – Big Love
Shirley Jones – The Cleaner
Lily Tomlin – Damages
Ann-Margret – Law & Order: SVU
Elizabeth Mitchell – LOST

 

*Full list of nominees

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TCA (Television Critics Assoc.) Nominations

6 Jun

On Friday June 4, 2010, the Television Critics Association announced their nominees for the 2010 TCA Awards.  The awards recognizes outstanding television programming in the 2009-2010 season, honoring both actors and producers in a variety of categories including news and information, youth, drama and comedy achievements.

The awards are a non-televised event and will take place in Beverly Hills, CA. on July 31, 2010.  Parenthood’s Dax Shepard will act as host for the presentation.

Individual Achievement in Drama
 Bryan Cranston (“Breaking Bad,” AMC)
 John Lithgow (“Dexter,” Showtime)
 Julianna Margulies (“The Good Wife,” CBS)
 Aaron Paul (“Breaking Bad”, AMC)
 Katey Sagal (“Sons of Anarchy,” FX)

Individual Achievement in Comedy
 Ty Burrell (“Modern Family,” ABC)
 Jane Lynch (“Glee,” Fox)
 Nick Offerman (“Parks and Recreation,” NBC)
 Jim Parsons (“The Big Bang Theory,” CBS)
 Eric Stonestreet (“Modern Family,” ABC)

Outstanding Achievement in News and Information
 “30 for 30” (ESPN)
 “America: The Story of Us” (History Channel)
 “Life” (Discovery Channel)
 “The Daily Show” (Comedy Central)
 “The Rachel Maddow Show” (MSNBC)

Outstanding Achievement in Youth Programming
 “Dinosaur Train” (PBS)
 “iCarly” (Nickelodeon)
 “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” (Cartoon Network)
 “Word Girl” (PBS)
 “Yo Gabba Gabba” (Nick Jr.)

Outstanding New Program
 “Glee” (Fox)
 “Justified” (FX)
 “Modern Family” (ABC)
 “Parenthood” (NBC)
 “The Good Wife” (CBS)

Outstanding Achievement in Movies, Miniseries and Specials
 “Life” (Discovery Channel)
 “Temple Grandin” (HBO)
 “The Pacific” (HBO)
 “Torchwood: Children of Earth” (BBC America)
 “You Don’t Know Jack” (HBO)

Outstanding Achievement in Drama
 “Breaking Bad” (AMC)
 “Lost” (ABC)
 “Mad Men” (AMC)
 “Sons of Anarchy” (FX)
 “The Good Wife” (CBS)

Outstanding Achievement in Comedy
 “Glee” (Fox)
 “Modern Family” (ABC)
 “Parks and Recreation” (NBC)
 “Party Down” (Starz)
 “The Big Bang Theory” (CBS)

Career Achievement Award
 James Garner
 Bill Moyers
 Sherwood Schwartz
 William Shatner
 Dick Wolf

Heritage Award
 “24”
 “M*A*S*H”
 “Law & Order”
 “Lost”
 “Twin Peaks”

Program of the Year
 “Breaking Bad” (AMC)
 “Friday Night Lights” (DirecTV/NBC)
 “Glee” (Fox)
 “Lost” (ABC)
 “Modern Family” (ABC)

My TV season wrap-up – Part 4 (Grey’s Anatomy, FlashForward)

28 May

May is here and that means the most recent television season has come to an end.  Season finales are usually filled with just enough drama to keep the viewer invested so that they return three months later.  This year’s group of shows really upped their games and were probably some of the best finales in quite a few seasons.

I wish I had enough time to watch every show that I love during the TV season, but that just isn’t possible.  I’ve picked some of the shows I love and have been devoted to all year to breakdown how they ended their seasons.  There will be some spoilers, so be warned.  The shows I will focus on are House, One Tree Hill, Modern Family, Cougar Town, Bones, Fringe, Grey’s Anatomy, Life Unexpected and FlashForward.  The final part of my series will focus on Grey’s Anatomy and the now defunct FlashForward.

Grey’s Anatomy:

The two-hour finale of Grey’s definitely reinvigorated the show as it ended its sixth season.  Creator Shonda Rhimes threw caution to the wind and wrote an episode that was filled with emotional good-bye’s, drama and mystery.  Having a shooter enter the hospital and take the lives of many characters was risky, but it totally paid off. 

Grey’s has been more popular the last few years for the behind the scenes and off-screen drama than for its storylines and artistic qualities.  With most of the buzzworthy actors now gone from the show (Katherine Heigl, T.R. Knight), the cast and crew can get back to what this show started out as: a fun, medical drama with an ensemble cast that draws viewers in for the story as well as the superficial attraction to the actors.

Some of the best acting from the last few years was on display in the finale.  Chandra Wilson gave an Emmy worthy performance as she watched one of her fellow doctors die in her arms.  The acting from the other cast members was top-notch as well, but the bigger story was the story.  Derek was shot, Meredith was pregnant…and miscarried, Owen chose Cristina, Alex called out for Izzie, Arizona and Callie decide to have a family, etc. 

The drama and character development in the finale alone should provide for much entertaining material next season.  I love the addition of Jesse Williams to the cast and look forward to what they have in store for him next.  I like Sarah Drew as an actress, but her role on Grey’s has been rough for me.  Her character has been very whiney and I’d like to see her grow a bit and the finale gave the perfect opportunity for that if she returns for season seven.

FlashForward:

I am absolutely bummed that this show will not be around for a second season.  I think there were just too many creative changes behind the scenes for a real shot here.  It also didn’t help that they took a very lengthy break half-way into the season.  This show was dubbed as the next LOST, but never caught on with viewers. 

Basically, the show was about a worldwide blackout that occurred and no one knew why or how it happened.  Over the season, the FBI got involved and it was revealed that there were double agents and others trying  to make sure that the answers were never found.  I don’t think the plot was as confusing as some made it out to be.  The problem was that many of the resolutions didn’t come until the last three or four episodes.

As I watched the final episode, I could definitely see a future for the show, but that’s just not going to happen.  I would love to know how the writers intended for the story to progress.  The show was built of an ensemble cast that included veterans from LOST (Sonya Walger, Dominic Monaghan) and other established actors (Joseph Fiennes, John Cho, Courtney B. Vance).  I really think the show started to come into its own and it’s a shame that the full vision won’t be realized.

You can check out the other parts in my series here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

My TV season wrap-up – Part 3 (Bones, Fringe)

25 May

May is here and that means the most recent television season has come to an end.  Season finales are usually filled with just enough drama to keep the viewer invested so that they return three months later.  This year’s group of shows really upped their games and were probably some of the best finales in quite a few seasons.

I wish I had enough time to watch every show that I love during the TV season, but that just isn’t possible.  I’ve picked some of the shows I love and have been devoted to all year to breakdown how they ended their seasons.  There will be some spoilers, so be warned.  The shows I will focus on are House, One Tree Hill, Modern Family, Cougar Town, Bones, Fringe, Grey’s Anatomy, Life Unexpected and FlashForward.  Part 3 of my series will focus on Bones and Fringe.

Bones:

I’ve loved this show since it began five years ago, but I’m hoping what they tried in the finale will actually lead to some change.  Bones (Emily Deschanel) and Booth (David Boreanaz) have been working side by side with sexual tension for years.  This past season, Booth finally admitted to Bones how he felt about her and she rejected him.  The 100th episode of the series, which focused on that reveal, was the beginning of change for the two.  Bones, a forensic anthropologist, has a difficult time relating to others. Booth, a FBI special agent, has been the one person who loves her for that and takes the time to teach her the socially acceptable way to behave around others.  When Booth revealed how he felt, Bones cried (which is highly uncharacteristic of her).

The following episodes up until the finale showed that even though Bones rejected him, that didn’t mean she didn’t have feelings for him.  The two main characters were given the opportunity to work apart and they decided it would be best to be separated for the one year that each project requested of them.  They said their final goodbye’s in an airport and although they didn’t share a kiss, the love could be felt even more because they didn’t.  The chemistry between the two characters is impalpable.

Obviously, the characters will not be split up for a year (hello, this is TV people!).  It will be exciting when the show comes back in the fall to see how they tackle the separation.  The supporting cast also dealt with changes in the finale and we’ll see if they go through transformations as well.  I’m a huge fan of the Hodgins/Angela relationship, so it was more than satisfying when they finally got married a few episodes ago.  The character of Sweets is hysterical and John Francis Daly (of Freaks and Geeks fame) was such a great addition to the cast a few seasons ago.

Fringe:

This show just finished up its sophomore season and it just keeps getting better.  Revolving around the fringe division of the FBI, the show tackles the unexplainable.  The cast is filled with veterans and newcomers alike.  John Noble is so deserving of an Emmy for his role as Dr. Walter Bishop that it boggles my mind he hasn’t even been nominated yet.  He has fantastic chemistry with his on-screen son, played by Joshua JacksonAnna Torv is a little one-dimensional for my liking, but toward the end of season two she’s been given more emotional scenes to play, which I like.

Along with the presence of fringe science and the ridiculously insane things that the characters come across, the show deals with two alternate universes.  Peter (Jackson) found out that he is not from the universe we all know of, but the alternate universe.  Walter was responsible and Peter travels to that other place.  Walter and Olivia (Torv) go to find him and Olivia reveals her feelings toward Peter once she finds him. 

The problem with the alternate universe is that there are doubles of everyone.  Whoever is in one universe is also in the other, but just because the outside may look the same, the people couldn’t be more different.  Olivia was captured in the finale and her double went back to the other universe with Peter and Walter, but no one knows of the switch. 

The stories on this show are outlandish, but so well executed.  Most of the characters could easily be cartoons of a character, but they are developed in such a way that gives them diverse layers.  As much as I think I want to see a Peter-Olivia relationship, I don’t know how I feel about it.  Luckily, with the switch that took place, the relationship will be postponed somewhat (at least with the real Olivia).  The decision to move the show to Thursdays resulted in a pretty large slashing of the number of viewers, but it is paired with a great lead-in in Bones.  Hopefully, season 3 will be a breakout season for the show said to resemble an X-Files type series.

*Part 4 will focus on Grey’s Anatomy and FlashForward

Click to read Part 1 & Part 2 of my TV wrap-up.

My TV season wrap-up – Part 2 (Modern Family, Cougar Town)

23 May

May is here and that means the most recent television season has come to an end.  Season finales are usually filled with just enough drama to keep the viewer invested so that they return three months later.  This year’s group of shows really upped their games and were probably some of the best finales in quite a few seasons.

I wish I had enough time to watch every show that I love during the TV season, but that just isn’t possible.  I’ve picked some of the shows I love and have been devoted to all year to breakdown how they ended their seasons.  There will be some spoilers, so be warned.  The shows I will focus on are House, One Tree Hill, Modern Family, Cougar Town, Bones, Fringe, Grey’s Anatomy, Life Unexpected and LOST.  Part 2 of my series will focus on Modern Family and Cougar Town.

Modern Family:

One of the breakout hits of this television season, Modern Family reinvigorated what a sitcom was and could be going into the future.  By pairing veteran and rookie talent, the show was able to capitalize on brilliant writing and ridiculous cast chemistry.  Not only was this show a family comedy, but it showcased the benefits of an ensemble cast.  Ed O’Neil and Julie Bowen were the most recognizable faces, but it was the off-beat humor of Ty Burrell, Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Rico Rodriguez that stood out from the pack.

Many times comedies don’t have a specific cliffhanger for the year.  The ending episode for season one of this show was an example of that.  It wasn’t necessary for the show to create something to entice viewers into tuning back in – it would happen even if they didn’t air a final episode.  The show has brought new life to the comedy genre and shown that with creative people at the helm of a project, anything can be successful.  The show ended the season by making chaos and lack of communication funny. 

For the most part, the show used guest star roles in a positive way.  Shelley Long as the ex-wife of O’Neil’s character was genius; I would love to see her make a few more appearances.  Elizabeth Banks as the crazy, drunk friend of Ferguson’s and Eric Stonestreet’s characters was pretty great as well.  My only criticism would be to watch the number of guest stars, because at some point it falls into stunt casting.  Glee is another show that is guilty of that as well. 

Cougar Town:

Created by Bill Lawrence of Scrubs fame, Cougar Town is a great example of a show that had one concept going in and changed it up as the show found its legs.  Lawrence has even talked about changing the name of the show for the second season in an attempt to have the name focus more on what the show has become and so that the name doesn’t alienate viewers who might think the show is only about the title.

The show began with Courteney Cox’s character on the hunt for a younger man, but the chemistry of the cast and the relationships that formed changed the direction the show was taking.  Christa Miller and Busy Phillips are great examples of how friendships among characters should work on sitcoms.  Their characters are very different, but each serve a specific purpose for the main character.  Dan Byrd who plays Cox’s son is such a refreshing young comedic talent.  His abilities have barely even been tapped into in my opinion.  Ian Gomez is just so darn likable and funny that I’d watch him on anything.

The show still needs some fine tuning and to find a solid direction to move in.  The romantic pairing of Cox’s and Josh Hopkins’ characters in season one is fun, but kind of mind-boggling.  Why go that route before the first season is even over?  Lawrence and the writers will need to be creative in finding ways to either sustain the relationship or change it as time goes on.  Another ensemble comedy, like Modern Family, lets viewers find the character they most relate to or like and follow their journeys throughout the run of the series.

*Part 3 of the series will focus on Bones and Fringe.

Click here for Part 1.

My TV season wrap-up – Part 1 (House, One Tree Hill, Life Unexpected)

22 May

May is here and that means the most recent television season has come to an end.  Season finales are usually filled with just enough drama to keep the viewer invested so that they return three months later.  This year’s group of shows really upped their games and were probably some of the best finales in quite a few seasons.

I wish I had enough time to watch every show that I love during the TV season, but that just isn’t possible.  I’ve picked some of the shows I love and have been devoted to all year to breakdown how they ended their seasons.  There will be some spoilers, so be warned.  The shows I will focus on are House, One Tree Hill, Modern Family, Cougar Town, Bones, Fringe, Grey’s Anatomy, Life Unexpected and LOST.  Part one of my series will include House, OTH and Life Unexpected.

HOUSE:

This show never fails to deliver in the acting category, but the finale from this year was multi-layered and made many fans giddy.  Along with the pairing of Huddy (House/Cuddy), the episode showed a more vulnerable House, which is always a good way to make things interesting.  House is always the sarcastic, cold doctor, so when the writers show other sides to his character it allows for a deeper connection with the audience and makes room for more exciting storylines.

Hugh Laurie has never disappointed in this role and the finale just showed once again the brilliance of his talent.  The first episode of the season (House in the psychiatric ward) and the finale, seemed to bring him full circle.  Fans have been begging for a real, non-fantasy, coupling of Huddy and they definitely got what they asked for.  Who really thought that it wouldn’t happen eventually though?  It will be interesting to see where the writers pick up when the show returns in the fall – will it be right after the kiss or days/weeks/months later?  I’m not too bummed about Thirteen putting in her notice; her character just isn’t that appealing to me.  The other supporting cast had very little to do in the finale, which was really the only let down.  I’d like to see some of them get a good story to play next season that isn’t only about assisting House with diagnoses.

One Tree Hill:

I watched the first half of the season, but failed to watch many of the most recent episodes until the finale.  Knowing that it was a bubble show, which may not have been coming back, I wanted to see how it would/could end.  (The show was renewed).  I was kind of impressed with the finale.  Taking the show to Utah was a good change of pace and watching the character of Haley struggle with depression was good writing and acting.  Bethany Joy Galeotti is a good actress and it’s nice to see her be able to showcase that once in a while.  I’ll admit that I miss the Lucas/Peyton characters as they had been central to the show for years.  I think if the show wants to stick around it needs to change things up a bit.  The absence of Lucas and Peyton allowed for that somewhat, but it also changed how the other characters were and I’m not sure I cared for that.

Music has always been a big part of the show, but I could have done without the bit parts that took place at Tric in the finale.  It was too much like filler without the substance.  It also did not mesh well with the other storylines that were taking place in Utah.  I can’t help it, but I find it hysterical that Stephen Colletti from MTV’s Laguna Beach is still on this show in a guest star capacity.  How did that ever happen?  I have no idea what direction they plan on taking this show in next season, but I wouldn’t mind a return visit from the two original characters that left last season. 

Life Unexpected:

I don’t have too much to say on this one simply because it was only on for about 13 episodes.  I will say that I am stoked that it’s coming back for a second season though.  I think this show has great potential, a cast perfectly suited for The CW and great chemistry between the characters.  The cliffhanger, which aired over a month ago, was perfect in that it showcased a love triangle that is only bound to get more complicated now that more episodes have been ordered. 

My only criticism is that I need to like the main character, Lux, more.  I get that she is a troubled girl who was ditched by her parents only to have them come back into her life at 17, but she’s miserable most of the time and that doesn’t lend itself for rooting value.  Britt Robertson (Lux) has awesome chemistry with Kristoffer Polaha (Baze), who plays her dad.  She seems more relatable whenever she shares scenes with him, so hopefully the writers will continue on with that.  Now that the show has been picked up, it will need to expand on the characters and take them in new directions all while keeping the audience interested in the stories they’ve already begun to tell.

*Part 2 of the series will focus on Modern Family and Cougar Town.

Glee and Modern Family score with Peabody Awards

31 Mar

The 2010 Peabody Awards recipients were announced today.  Glee and Modern Family are among a list of both entertainment and news programming recognized for achievement and service in electronic media (radio, TV, cable)…

Glee and Modern Family score with Peabody Awards

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